Customer Service:
1-570-955-1438

Text Message for a Quote:
1-570-301-7456

Quakers

The Quakers, or Religious Society of Friends as they are officially known, are a Protestant religious sect that had the origins in the mid-seventeenth century. After the English Civil War of 1641-51, a man named George Fox began to envision restoring an older form of Christianity, one devoid of a clergy or hierarchy. It also emphasized the importance of the family unit in religious worship and elevated the status of women – at least in comparison to other religions of that time. QuakersFox preached throughout England and Wale, and by 1660 he had gained nearly 60,000 adherents. But the Quakers were a revolutionary threat to the English social order and came under state persecution. The name Quakers was bestowed on the movement by its enemies as a way of ridiculing their rigid devotion to the word.

Many Quakers sought to immigrate to the English colonies of North America to avoid the persecutions and build their vision of an ideal Christian society. Although initially not welcomed by the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay Colony, Quakers became dominant in neighboring Rhode Island. But the most famous Quaker settlement was established by William Penn in what became the colony of Pennsylvania. Here the Quakers established a commonwealth that included a legislature, right to a trial by jury, and public education. The Quakers were also tolerant of other faiths and under their influence Pennsylvania became a thriving colony which would exert a dominant role in American history. Quakerism consequently split off into difference sects and life on the rugged frontier challenged many Quaker beliefs, including pacifism. Although Quakers still exist today they are a tiny minority numbering no more than a few hundred thousand. However many of the protestant sects that emerged in North America during the First and Second Great Awakenings were influenced by the Quakers.

Related Research Paper Topics

Confession of Faith - Research papers on a confession of faith look into the formal statement used within a religion that is designed to be recited in a public faith gathering to agree to the group’s theology.

Humanitarianism - The first group to begin agitating for its eradication was the Quakers, who began the slow process by which slavery was abolished in Great Britain by the beginning of the 19th century.

William Lloyd Garrison - When he was nine, Garrison was sent to be an apprentice with an individual who was a Quaker.

Edward Hicks - One of the most famous artists to create pieces in this genre was Edward Hicks, a prominent minister in the Society of Friends, or Quakers.

Women in the Protestant Religion - Women in the Protestant Religion. There are numerous branches of the Protestant church that allow women to enjoy full equality with men, including the right to become ordained ministers.

World Council of Churches - HIV Research Papers look at research on HIV and AIDS In Africa, more people die of the disease than get married.

Herbert Hoover - Hoover was raised in the Quaker religion. From when Hoover was a child he realized that it was necessary to be self-reliant and a hard worker.

Walt Whitman - Walt Whitman was born on May 31, 1819 in Long Island, New York. He died on March 26, 1892 in Camden, New Jersey. He was the second of nine children born to poor parents. His father was a farmer, a carpenter and a day laborer.

Christian Education research papers look at the complexities of society today demonstrate the growing need for every person to have a solid foundation in education and values.